SELF HARM & SUICIDE TRAINING COURSES
 

Apply Here

Suicide TALK

Learn four basic steps to recognize persons with thoughts of suicide and connect them with suicide helping resources.
This three hour training can help you make a difference.
Why come to safeTALK?
Most people with thoughts of suicide invite help.  Often these      opportunities are missed, dismissed or avoided – learning people more alone and at greater risk.  SafeTALK training prepared you to help by using TALK (Tell, Ask, Listen and KeepSafe) to identify and engage people with thoughts of suicide and to connect them with further help and care.

Who should attend safeTALK?
SafeTALK is for everyone who wants to help prevent suicide: front line workers, clergy, volunteers, parents, youth,*teachers, law enforcement,  . . . . anyone who wants to help prevent suicide.
 * safeTALK is for anyone age 15 and older.

SafeTALK training will take place as follows:

DATE
Thursday 11 April 2013, Centre for Health Sciences, Ground Floor Classroom 2, 9.30 am – 12.30 pm

Or
Thursday 25 April 2013, Centre for Health Sciences, Ground Floor Classroom 3, 9.30 am – 12.30 pm

 

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST)

NHS Boards have been tasked by the government to educate and train key frontline staff in mental health and substance misuse services, primary care and accident and emergency staff in using suicide prevention training programmes. ASIST is the minimum learning level requirement for primary care nurses and AHPs (non mental health).
 
ASIST could be described as “suicide first aid” and it aims to help you learn to recognise and estimate risk of suicide, and become more effective at helping those people who may be at immediate risk. This is an internationally recognised training event, supported by the Scottish Government, with 400,000 people already trained in ASIST, world-wide.
 
The following ASIST courses have been arranged in Inverness and Wick.

 

Thursday and Friday 25/26 April 2013
Venue: Centre for Health Science, Ground Floor W009&010, Old Perth, Road, Inverness,

Thursday and Friday 30/31 May 2013
Venue:  Inshes Church, Sir Walter Scott Drive, Inverness (By Matalan)
 
Thursday and Friday 20/21 June 2013
Venue:  Pulteneytown People’s Project, Pulteney Centre, Huddart Street, Wick, KW1 5BA

For ASIST Training, apply HERE 
 

Anyone attending must be able to commit to the two full days from 9am until 5pm.
 

 
There are 24 places available on this course. Priority will be given to primary care nurses, including public health nurses, health visitors and school nurses in the first instance.


 

Confirmation of successful applications will be sent out to you by post or by e-mail no later than one week prior to the course.
 
Please send the attached form to: Helen Service, Room 4, Management Team, New Craigs Hospital, Inverness, IV3 8NP. Telephone: 01463 704000  Ext:2232

About the course:

ASIST:
Learn first-aid skills 
Just as “CPR” skills make physical first aid possible, training in suicide intervention develops the skills used in suicide first aid.  ASIST is a two-day intensive, interactive and practice-dominated course designed to help caregivers recognise and estimate risk, and learn how to intervene to prevent the immediate risk of suicide.
 
The workshop is for all caregivers (any person in a position of trust).  This includes professionals, paraprofessionals and lay people.  It is suitable for community groups, clergy, church groups, teachers, employers and employees, counsellors, youth workers, police and correctional staff, school support staff, clergy, community volunteers, nurses, mental health professionals and physicians.
 

ASIST has five learning modules:
Preparing – sets the tone, norms, and expectations of the learning experience.
Connecting – sensitises participants to their own attitudes towards suicide.  Creates an understanding of the impact which attitudes have on the intervention process.
Understanding – provides participants with the knowledge and skills to recognise and estimate the risk of suicide.
Assisting – presents a model for effective suicide intervention.  Participants develop their skills through observation, supervised simulation experiences and role playing.
Networking – generates information about resources in the local community.  Promotes a commitment by participants to transform local resources into helping networks.  
Emphasising structured small-group discussions and practice, the course uses case-studies, workbooks and two award-winning audiovisuals.  Participants receive a 110 page Suicide Intervention Handbook and a full colour laminated pocket card featuring intervention and risk estimation principles.  They serve as living refreshers of the workshop learning.
 
ASIST is designed to help all caregivers become more comfortable, competent and confident when dealing with persons at risk.  Prepared caregivers can help prevent suicide.
 
Unprepared caregivers tend to deny, avoid, and even stigmatise persons at risk.  That is what society has traditionally done.  All evidence indicates that unprepared caregivers continue this dangerous tradition.  Training is required to turn denial, avoidance and stigmatisation into vigilance, understanding and help.
 
Learn Suicide First Aid
Join over 250,000 caregivers and participate in LivingWorks’ ASIST workshop.  Learn to recognise and estimate risk, and become more effective at helping people at risk.  The benefits will live on. 
LivingWorks
The LivingWorks Program is a comprehensive, co-ordinated and integrated approach to suicide prevention, which involves the entire community.  LivingWorks creates learning experiences that help communities prevent suicide and assist life.  We are a public service corporation, dedicated to enhancing resources today and saving lives for tomorrow.  Our programs are cost-effective and easy-to-learn, with practical applications for all concerned community members.
 
People are dying for Suicide First Aid
Suicide affects us all.  It’s an international problem. One in nine has seriously considered suicide; persons bereaved by suicide are eight times more likely to commit suicide.

No one is protected.  Men and women of all ages, of all occupations and all socio-economic groups are at risk.  There is no guarantee of safety from suicide.  The key to suicide prevention is trained caregivers who are ready willing and able to get involved with each individual at risk – caregivers who can recognise individuals who are at risk and who know how to intervene to prevent the risk of suicidal thoughts becoming suicidal behaviours.
 
A lost spouse, son, daughter, friends or co-worker can’t be replaced.  And as those who have experienced such loss understand, it is the emotional costs, which demand our involvement in preventing suicide.

Something can be done

The vast majority of those planning suicide will find some way to signal their intent.  Most suicidal people are looking for another option.  They would prefer to find a way to live.  But preventing suicide takes two people – a helper and the person at risk.
 
Government reports in Canada, the United States, United Kingdom and Finland, by the European World Health Organisation and the United Nations emphasise that caregiver competence is a critical component in any large-scale suicide prevention program.

 
ASIST Helps Prepare Caregivers
ASIST is designed to help all caregivers become more comfortable, competent and confident when dealing with persons at risk. The actions of prepared caregivers can help prevent suicide.
 

Further 2013 Dates will be available shortly

An introduction to the development of mental and emotional wellbeing in children & young people (Day 1)

1 day course: 9.30am-4.30pm


This training is designed for staff who have regular contact with children and/or families, including those working within adult services. This course aims to provide participants with an understanding of what is ‘normal’ for children and young people’s mental and emotional development, so that they can begin to recognise when this may be negatively impacted. This will help practitioners feel more confident in recognising and responding to the behaviours of children and young people experiencing distress.

This course is a Programme 2 course, providing the foundation to all Children & Young People’s Mental Health Training including Getting it Right for Children & Young People’s Mental Health (Day 2) and Getting it Right for Children In Distress, and must be completed before going on to either of these training courses.

What can I expect from this training?

By the end of this training, staff should:
• Understand what is normal for children/young people’s emotional health and development.
• Recognise factors that can impact on the mental and emotional wellbeing of children/ young people.
• Identify some of the signs/indicators that a child/young person may be in emotional distress.
• Appreciate the potential of positive relationships.
• Consider events from a child/young person’s perspective (socially, emotionally and biologically)
• Identify what other factors can impact on successful outcomes.
• Know how to raise the issues and to feel more confident in responding appropriately.
• Reflect on our own roles in working with children/ young people whose mental/ emotional wellbeing has been compromised.
• Gain the necessary knowledge/ confidence to go on to complete further Children & Young People’s Mental Health Training including Getting it Right for Children & Young People’s Mental Health (Day 2) and/ or Getting it Right for Children In Distress, successfully.

An introduction to the development of mental and emotional wellbeing in children & young people (Day 1)
1 day course: 9.30am-4.30pm
This training is designed for staff who have regular contact with children and/or families, including those working within adult services. This course aims to provide participants with an understanding of what is ‘normal’ for children and young people’s mental and emotional development, so that they can begin to recognise when this may be negatively impacted. This will help practitioners feel more confident in recognising and responding to the behaviours of children and young people experiencing distress.

This course is a Programme 2 course, providing the foundation to all Children & Young People’s Mental Health Training including Getting it Right for Children & Young People’s Mental Health (Day 2) and Getting it Right for Children In Distress, and must be completed before going on to either of these training courses.

What can I expect from this training?

By the end of this training, staff should:
• Understand what is normal for children/young people’s emotional health and development.
• Recognise factors that can impact on the mental and emotional wellbeing of children/ young people.
• Identify some of the signs/indicators that a child/young person may be in emotional distress.
• Appreciate the potential of positive relationships.
• Consider events from a child/young person’s perspective (socially, emotionally and biologically)
• Identify what other factors can impact on successful outcomes.
• Know how to raise the issues and to feel more confident in responding appropriately.
• Reflect on our own roles in working with children/ young people whose mental/ emotional wellbeing has been compromised.
• Gain the necessary knowledge/ confidence to go on to complete further Children & Young People’s Mental Health Training including Getting it Right for Children & Young People’s Mental Health (Day 2) and/ or Getting it Right for Children In Distress, successfully.

Who should attend?

All staff who have regular contact with children and young people and/or their family members should attend this training.
In particular those staff who:
• Have regular contact with vulnerable children and families
• Carry out direct work with children and families

If you have attended the Getting it Right for Children in Distress or the Getting it Right for Children & Young People’s Mental Health
in the last 2 years, you should NOT attend this training as it is an amended version of these courses.


Further Information and Application Process

Certificates are provided for completing this course and are valid for 3 years.

For further information and application details, please contact Helen Service at helen.service@nhs.net


All staff who have regular contact with children and young people and/or their family members should attend this training.
In particular those staff who:
• Have regular contact with vulnerable children and families
• Carry out direct work with children and families

If you have attended the Getting it Right for Children in Distress or the Getting it Right for Children & Young People’s Mental Health
in the last 2 years, you should NOT attend this training as it is an amended version of these courses.


Further Information and Application Process

Certificates are provided for completing this course and are valid for 3 years.

For further information and application details, please contact Helen Service


Getting It Right for Children & Young People’s Mental Health – Identifying & Responding To Children & Young People In Distress (Day 2)

1 day course: 9.30am-4.30pm


This training is designed for staff who have regular contact with children and/or families, including those working within adult services. This course is a follow on to ‘An introduction to the development of mental and emotional wellbeing in children & young people (Day 1)’ (which is a pre-requisite for this course). It aims to raise participant’s knowledge and confidence in intervening effectively with children and young people in distress and to provide participants with skills and tools for dealing with issues including children at risk of self harm and/or suicidal ideation.

This course is a Programme 3 course, see The Highland Training Framework.

What can I expect from this training?

By the end of this training, participants should:

• Be able to identify some of the signs/indicators that a child/young person may be in emotional distress.
• Consider events from a child/young person’s perspective (socially, emotionally and biologically)
• Identify what other factors can impact on successful outcomes.
• Explore concerns regarding risk and look at ways to manage/ minimise risk and promote personal safety.
• Know how to raise the issues and to feel confident in responding appropriately.
• Be able to respond in a crisis situation.
• Have the opportunity to practice skills/intervening in a safe/supportive environment with colleagues.
• Reflect on professionals own role and the requirements and limitations in identifying and responding to Children In Distress
• Be able to identify supports/resources and know how to access them.

Who should attend?

Anyone who has completed ‘An introduction to the development of mental and emotional wellbeing in children & young people (Day 1)’ and requires further information and skills on how to intervene with children & young people in distress.

All staff who have regular contact with children and young people and/or their family members should attend this training.
In particular those staff who:
• Have regular contact with vulnerable children and families
• Carry out direct work with children and families

If you have attended the Getting it Right for Children in Distress in the last 2 years, you should NOT attend this training as it is an amended version of this courses.

Course Pre-requisite

Participants MUST have completed ‘An introduction to the development of mental and emotional wellbeing in children & young people (Day 1).


Further Information and Application Process

Certificates are provided for completing this course and are valid for 3 years.

Training dates are listed at the bottom of the page.

For further information and application details, please contact Helen Service at helen.service@nhs.net



Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST)

NHS Boards have been tasked by the government to educate and train key frontline staff in mental health and substance misuse services, primary care and accident and emergency staff in using suicide prevention training programmes. ASIST is the minimum learning level requirement for primary care nurses and AHPs (non mental health).

ASIST could be described as “suicide first aid” and it aims to help you learn to recognise and estimate risk of suicide, and become more effective at helping those people who may be at immediate risk. This is an internationally recognised training event, supported by the Scottish Government, with 400,000 people already trained in ASIST, world-wide.

There are 24 places available on this course. Priority will be given to primary care nurses, including public health nurses, health visitors and school nurses in the first instance. Provision is being made to roll out further training in the future for all appropriate staff groups.


Confirmation of successful applications will be sent out to you by post or by e-mail no later than one week prior to the course.

I would be obliged if you could distribute this information within your department as appropriate and ask that people who wish to attend the course please let me know by completing the form provided and returning it to this office. Please ensure that the form has been signed by your manager.

Please send the attached form to: Helen Service, Room 4, Management Team, New Craigs Hospital, Inverness, IV3 8NP.
Telephone: 01463 704000 Ext:2232


ASIST:
Learn first-aid skills

Just as “CPR” skills make physical first aid possible, training in suicide intervention develops the skills used in suicide first aid. ASIST is a two-day intensive, interactive and practice-dominated course designed to help caregivers recognise and estimate risk, and learn how to intervene to prevent the immediate risk of suicide.

The workshop is for all caregivers (any person in a position of trust). This includes professionals, paraprofessionals and lay people. It is suitable for community groups, clergy, church groups, teachers, employers and employees, counsellors, youth workers, police and correctional staff, school support staff, clergy, community volunteers, nurses, mental health professionals and physicians.

ASIST has five learning modules:

1) Preparing – sets the tone, norms, and expectations of the learning experience.
2) Connecting – sensitises participants to their own attitudes towards suicide. Creates an understanding of the impact which attitudes have on the intervention process.
3) Understanding – provides participants with the knowledge and skills to recognise and estimate the risk of suicide.
4) Assisting – presents a model for effective suicide intervention. Participants develop their skills through observation, supervised simulation experiences and role playing.
5) Networking – generates information about resources in the local community. Promotes a commitment by participants to transform local resources into helping networks.

Emphasising structured small-group discussions and practice, the course uses case-studies, workbooks and two award-winning audiovisuals. Participants receive a 110 page Suicide Intervention Handbook and a full colour laminated pocket card featuring intervention and risk estimation principles. They serve as living refreshers of the workshop learning.

ASIST is designed to help all caregivers become more comfortable, competent and confident when dealing with persons at risk. Prepared caregivers can help prevent suicide.

Unprepared caregivers tend to deny, avoid, and even stigmatise persons at risk. That is what society has traditionally done. All evidence indicates that unprepared caregivers continue this dangerous tradition. Training is required to turn denial, avoidance and stigmatisation into vigilance, understanding and help.

Learn Suicide First Aid
Join over 250,000 caregivers and participate in LivingWorks’ ASIST workshop. Learn to recognise and estimate risk, and become more effective at helping people at risk. The benefits will live on.

LivingWorks
The LivingWorks Program is a comprehensive, co-ordinated and integrated approach to suicide prevention, which involves the entire community. LivingWorks creates learning experiences that help communities prevent suicide and assist life. We are a public service corporation, dedicated to enhancing resources today and saving lives for tomorrow. Our programs are cost-effective and easy-to-learn, with practical applications for all concerned community members.

People are dying for Suicide First Aid
Suicide affects us all. It’s an international problem. One in nine has seriously considered suicide; persons bereaved by suicide are eight times more likely to commit suicide.

No one is protected. Men and women of all ages, of all occupations and all socio-economic groups are at risk. There is no guarantee of safety from suicide. The key to suicide prevention is trained caregivers who are ready willing and able to get involved with each individual at risk – caregivers who can recognise individuals who are at risk and who know how to intervene to prevent the risk of suicidal thoughts becoming suicidal behaviours.

A lost spouse, son, daughter, friends or co-worker can’t be replaced. And as those who have experienced such loss understand, it is the emotional costs, which demand our involvement in preventing suicide.

Something can be done
The vast majority of those planning suicide will find some way to signal their intent. Most suicidal people are looking for another option. They would prefer to find a way to live. But preventing suicide takes two people – a helper and the person at risk.

Government reports in Canada, the United States, United Kingdom and Finland, by the European World Health Organisation and the United Nations emphasise that caregiver competence is a critical component in any large-scale suicide prevention program.

ASIST Helps Prepare Caregivers
ASIST is designed to help all caregivers become more comfortable, competent and confident when dealing with persons at risk. The actions of prepared caregivers can help prevent suicide.